Menu

SKin care in lymphoedema

Choose a Therapy Back
Jan Thomson

SKin care in lymphoedema

Posted by Jan Thomson 580 Days Ago


em

SECRETS OF LYMPHOEDEMA SKIN CARE

What  can I  do to look after my skin?

Cleanse your skin

Wash daily with warm water and soap/soap substitute.

  • Dry skin thoroughly especially between fingers and toes

Moisturise your skin

  • Apply moisturising cream to prevent cracking and drying. Creams are better than lotion as have a greater moisturising effect

Look at your skin

  • When cutting nails take care not to damage cuticle
  • Use high factor suntan lotion. Be aware you can get burnt through garments
  • Daily skin care to prevent infection

WHY SHOULD I LOOK AFTER MY SKIN?

The skin acts as a barrier to bacteria and other pathogens. Any break in the skin such as burns, chafing, dryness, cuticle injury, cracks, cuts, splinters, and insect bites can present an entry site for bacteria and cause infection. Well moisturised skin will reduce the risk of cellulitis. This is a skin infection.

CELLULITIS. Symptoms can appear suddenly and make you feel unwell

What to look out for:

  • Red inflamed skin or a rash on the affected limb
  • Warm/hot, tender tissues. The skin may look tight and glossy
  • Sudden onset
  • Pain/tenderness
  • Increased swelling which may happen quickly
  • May just get ‘Flu-like’ symptoms/feeling unwell

 

What do I do?

If you think you have an infection, seek medical help immediately from your GP. If you notice these symptoms out of hours, contact your out of hours GP service. It is important to act quickly to prevent infection from getting worse. You will need antibiotics as soon as symptoms occur and you must take them for NO LESS THAN TWO WEEKS.

  • Remove your support garment
  • Do not   exercise your limb
  • Do not do your simple Lymphatic Drainage 

 

 

You can resume wearing garments and doing simple lymphatic drainage once the infection is under control- usually within 5-6 days.

 

Injuries

  • Clean the area well

  • Use antiseptic solution or cream

  • Cover with a sterile dressing or plaster

  • If in doubt seek medical advice

  • If the area becomes red, hot or painful, you may have an infection-seek medical help.

 

SECRETS OF LYMPHOEDEMA SKIN CARE

What  can I  do to look after my skin?

Cleanse your skin

Wash daily with warm water and soap/soap substitute.

  • Dry skin thoroughly especially between fingers and toes

Moisturise your skin

  • Apply moisturising cream to prevent cracking and drying. Creams are better than lotion as have a greater moisturising effect

Look at your skin

  • When cutting nails take care not to damage cuticle
  • Use high factor suntan lotion. Be aware you can get burnt through garments
  • Daily skin care to prevent infection

WHY SHOULD I LOOK AFTER MY SKIN?

The skin acts as a barrier to bacteria and other pathogens. Any break in the skin such as burns, chafing, dryness, cuticle injury, cracks, cuts, splinters, and insect bites can present an entry site for bacteria and cause infection. Well moisturised skin will reduce the risk of cellulitis. This is a skin infection.

CELLULITIS. Symptoms can appear suddenly and make you feel unwell

What to look out for:

  • Red inflamed skin or a rash on the affected limb
  • Warm/hot, tender tissues. The skin may look tight and glossy
  • Sudden onset
  • Pain/tenderness
  • Increased swelling which may happen quickly
  • May just get ‘Flu-like’ symptoms/feeling unwell

 

What do I do?

If you think you have an infection, seek medical help immediately from your GP. If you notice these symptoms out of hours, contact your out of hours GP service. It is important to act quickly to prevent infection from getting worse. You will need antibiotics as soon as symptoms occur and you must take them for NO LESS THAN TWO WEEKS.

  • Remove your support garment
  • Do not   exercise your limb
  • Do not do your simple Lymphatic Drainage 

 

 

You can resume wearing garments and doing simple lymphatic drainage once the infection is under control- usually within 5-6 days.

 

Injuries

  • Clean the area well

  • Use antiseptic solution or cream

  • Cover with a sterile dressing or plaster

  • If in doubt seek medical advice

  • If the area becomes red, hot or painful, you may have an infection-seek medical help.

 

Jan Thomson

Article written by Jan Thomson - Cardiff

I am a qualified lymphoedema specialist and holistic practitioner in practice in Cardiff since 1998.
I have 14 years of experience of working within the local health service as a medically qualified specialist lymphoedema practitioner. I am experienced in all aspects of treatment and on going care of diagnosed primary... [read more]

Aromatherapy
Manual Lymphatic Drainage
Massage Therapy
Reflexology

View Profile