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Jenny Howell

Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction or pelvic pain during pregnancy

Posted by Jenny Howell

1169 Days Ago


During pregnancy, the body produces a hormone called Relaxin. This prepares the body for giving birth by making the ligaments more stretchy and elastic so that the baby can move through the pelvic canal. This can lead to the pubic bone moving anteriorly (forwards) or laterally (sideways) because it is not held in as strong a position as before. This can result in pain in the pubic bone, back, hips and legs. It is quite common: about 1 in 5 pregnant women suffer from some pelvic pain. It resolves in most cases following childbirth.

It is important to get help early on to prevent the pain becoming too severe. An osteopath can help by assessing the position of the pelvic girdle in order to correctly diagnose the problem. Exercises to strengthen the core muscles and stretch tight muscles can help, as well as gentle mobilization of the joints involved.

Women are advised to make certain adaptations to reduce the pain:

  • It may be helpful to lie on one's side with a pillow between the knees as well as keeping the knees together when getting out of the car or bed.
  • It is better to carry on exercising where possible without causing too much pain. walking with small steps can help as well as avoiding exercise such as swimming breaststroke.
  • Avoid carrying heavy objects and doing vigorous housework
  • Avoid standing for long periods of time.
  • Some women may need to wear a maternity belt to give their pelvic girdle extra support 

Don't suffer in pain get help and advice. Ring to discuss or make an appointment with Jenny

Jenny Howell

Article written by Jenny Howell - London

I have always been interested in achieving good health naturally. I worked as a Welfare Rights Worker for many years but after having children I decided to go in a different direction. I took my baby son to see a cranial osteopath because he was suffering with glue ear. He responded... [read more]

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